Australian Dollar

Australian Dollar

The Australian dollar (sign: $; code: AUD) is the currency of the Commonwealth of Australia, including its external territories Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Norfolk Island, as well as the independent Pacific Island states of Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. The Australian dollar was legal tender of Papua New Guinea until 1 January 1976, when the Papua New Guinean kina became the sole legal tender. Within Australia, it is almost always abbreviated with the dollar sign ($), with A$ or AU$ sometimes used to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies. It is subdivided into 100 cents. In 2016, the Australian dollar was the fifth most traded currency in the world, accounting for 6.9% of the world's daily share (down from 8.6% in 2013). It trades in the world foreign exchange markets behind the US dollar, the euro, the yen and the pound sterling. The Australian dollar is popular with currency traders, because of the comparatively high interest rates in Australia, the relative freedom of the foreign exchange market from government intervention, the general stability of Australia's economy and political system, and the prevailing view that the Australian dollar offers diversification benefits in a portfolio containing the major world currencies, especially because of its greater exposure to Asian economies and the commodities cycle. The currency is commonly referred to by foreign-exchange traders as the "Aussie dollar".

Silver Ounce

Silver Ounce

Silver is a chemical element with symbol Ag (from the Latin argentum, derived from the Proto-Indo-European h₂erǵ: "shiny" or "white") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form ("native silver"), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining. Silver has long been valued as a precious metal. Silver metal is used in many bullion coins, sometimes alongside gold: while it is more abundant than gold, it is much less abundant as a native metal. Its purity is typically measured on a per-mille basis; a 94%-pure alloy is described as "0.940 fine". As one of the seven metals of antiquity, silver has had an enduring role in most human cultures. Other than in currency and as an investment medium (coins and bullion), silver is used in solar panels, water filtration, jewellery, ornaments, high-value tableware and utensils (hence the term silverware), in electrical contacts and conductors, in specialized mirrors, window coatings, in catalysis of chemical reactions, as a colorant in stained glass and in specialised confectionery. Its compounds are used in photographic and X-ray film. Dilute solutions of silver nitrate and other silver compounds are used as disinfectants and microbiocides (oligodynamic effect), added to bandages and wound-dressings, catheters, and other medical instruments.

19 Australian Dollar to Silver Ounce exchange rates chart

19 AUD to XAG exchange rates graph
19 AUD to XAG Spot rate – This is known more formally as the ‘interbank’ rate. It is the rate banks or large financial institutions charge each other when trading significant amounts of foreign currency. In the business, this is sometimes referred to as a ‘spot rate’. It is not the tourist rate and you cannot buy currency at this rate, as you are buying relatively small amounts of foreign currency. In everyday life it is the same as the difference between wholesale and retail prices. The rates shown in financial newspapers and in broadcast media are usually the interbank rates.

19 AUD to XAG exchange rates table

Exchange AUD to XAG
19 Australian Dollar = 0.979 Silver Ounce
38 Australian Dollar = 1.957 Silver Ounce
95 Australian Dollar = 4.893 Silver Ounce
190 Australian Dollar = 9.786 Silver Ounce
Exchange Australian Dollar to Silver Ounce
19 Australian Dollar to Silver Ounce Cross rate – This is the rate we give to customers who want to exchange currencies that do not involve the local currency. For example, if you want to exchange Australian dollars into US dollars.

19 AUD to XAG exchange rates news

Australian dollar slides
Australian dollar slides

Aussie dollar falls against the greenback.

indicative neutral
$A near multi-month highs amid Fed caution - 9Finance

Flaring Sino-US trade tensions have kept the Aussie dollar off its high, but the currency is still at a mul...

conditional neutral
Aussie, kiwi near multi-month highs as Fed caution weighs on dollar

SYDNEY, Nov 19- The Australia and New Zealand dollars held near multi-month peaks on Monday as the greenback stumbled on concerns about slowing.

indicative neutral
Gold, silver turn weak on sluggish local demand, bearish global cues

Read more about Gold, silver turn weak on sluggish local demand, bearish global cues on Business Standard. Globally, gold fell 0.11 per cent to $1,220.80 an ounce and silver by 0.21 per cent to $14.46 an ounce

indicative negative
Gold, silver turn weak on sluggish demand, global cues - Times of India

India Business News: New Delhi, Nov 19 () Gold shed Rs 50 to Rs 32,100 per 10 gram at the bullion market Monday, owing to slackened demand from local jewellers amid a weak

indicative neutral
Gold, silver higher

Gold, silver higher on WTOP | NEW YORK (AP) — The November gold contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange closed today at $1,220.80 an ounce — up $8.00. The current silver contract on the “NYMEX” closed at $14.36 an ounce — up 12 cents.

indicative neutral

19 AUD to XAG currency converter