Thai Baht

Thai Baht

The baht (; Thai: บาท, pronounced [bàːt]; sign: ฿; code:100 THB) is the official currency of Thailand. It is subdivided into 100 satang (สตางค์, pronounced [sətāːŋ]). The issuance of currency is the responsibility of the Bank of Thailand. According to SWIFT, as of February 2017, the Thai baht is ranked as the 10th most frequently used world payment currency.According to a report in the South China Morning Post, the China Banknote Printing and Minting Corporation produces at least some Thai banknotes and coins.

Ghanaian Cedi

Ghanaian Cedi

The Ghanaian cedi (currency sign: GH₵; currency code: GHS) is the unit of currency of Ghana. It is the fourth historical and only current legal tender in the Republic of Ghana. One cedi is divided into one hundred pesewas (Gp). After it gained independence Ghana separated itself from the British West African pound, which was the currency of the British colonies in the region. The new republic's first independent currency was the Ghanaian pound (1958-1965). In 1965, Ghana decided to leave the British colonial monetary system and adopt the widely accepted decimal system. The African name Cedi (1965-1967) was introduced in place of the old British pound system. Ghana's first President Kwame Nkrumah introduced Cedi notes and Pesewa coins in July 1965 to replace the Ghanaian pounds, shillings and pence. The cedi was equivalent to eight shillings and four pence (8s 4d) and bore the portrait of the President. After the February 1966 military coup, the new leaders wanted to remove the face of Nkrumah from the banknotes. The "new cedi" (1967-2007) was worth 1.2 cedis which made it equal to half of a pound sterling at its introduction. After decades of high inflation devalued the new cedi, it was gradually phased out in 2007 in favor of the "Ghana cedi" at an exchange rate of 1:10,000. In 2007 the largest of the new cedi banknotes, the 20,000 note, had a value of about US$2. By removing four digits, the Ghana cedi became the highest-denominated currency unit issued in Africa. It has since lost about 75% of its value.

6 Thai Baht to Ghanaian Cedi exchange rates chart

6 THB to GHS exchange rates graph
6 THB to GHS Spot rate – This is known more formally as the ‘interbank’ rate. It is the rate banks or large financial institutions charge each other when trading significant amounts of foreign currency. In the business, this is sometimes referred to as a ‘spot rate’. It is not the tourist rate and you cannot buy currency at this rate, as you are buying relatively small amounts of foreign currency. In everyday life it is the same as the difference between wholesale and retail prices. The rates shown in financial newspapers and in broadcast media are usually the interbank rates.

6 THB to GHS exchange rates table

Exchange THB to GHS
6 Thai Baht = 0.931 Ghanaian Cedi
12 Thai Baht = 1.862 Ghanaian Cedi
30 Thai Baht = 4.655 Ghanaian Cedi
60 Thai Baht = 9.311 Ghanaian Cedi
Exchange Thai Baht to Ghanaian Cedi
6 Thai Baht to Ghanaian Cedi Cross rate – This is the rate we give to customers who want to exchange currencies that do not involve the local currency. For example, if you want to exchange Australian dollars into US dollars.

6 THB to GHS exchange rates news

Thai top court orders compensation for Myanmar workers in landmark case

The workers complained about forced overtime, being paid less than the minimum wage, confiscation of passports, and limited freedom of movement

3 days indicative negative
It's Bad; Times Are Really Hard In Ghana – Yvonne Nelson

It's Bad; Times Are Really Hard In Ghana – Yvonne Nelson

about 1 month indicative negative
Cedi, 7 Others Appreciate Against Dollar

Cedi, 7 Others Appreciate Against Dollar

about 2 months indicative neutral
Recent cedi depreciation is temporary - BoG Official

The recent blip in the foreign exchange market that saw a slight depreciation of the cedi against the dollar is short-term and a reflection of a spillover from external developments, an official of the Bank of Ghana has said.

about 2 months conditional positive
Akufo-Addo’s cedi performance in 18 months impressive than NDC’s 6 years – Ofori-Atta

The Finance Minister, Ken Ofori-Atta says although the cedi has come under extreme external pressure, its performance in the past 18 months under the Akufo-Addo-led administration is one of the best.

about 2 months indicative positive
The invisible hand of government in cedi depreciation

As the normal principle of economics says, when a domestic currency depreciates it makes the prices of goods and services decline compared to the international prices.

about 2 months conditional neutral

6 THB to GHS currency converter