Malagasy Ariary

Malagasy Ariary

Malagasy Ariary overview

The ariary (sign: Ar; ISO 4217 code MGA) is the currency of Madagascar. It is subdivided into 5 iraimbilanja and is one of only two non-decimal currencies currently circulating (the other is the Mauritanian ouguiya). The names ariary and iraimbilanja derive from the pre-colonial currency, with ariary (from the Spanish word "real") being the name for a silver dollar. Iraimbilanja means literally "one iron weight" and was the name of an old coin worth ​1⁄5 of an ariary.

1 MGA to USD exchange rates chart

MGA to  exchange rates chart

Malagasy Ariary news

This powerful essay about a painful childhood memory got a student into 14 colleges including Harvard, Stanford, and Princeton

A Harvard graduate shared her powerful admissions essay on bullying.

about 2 months conditional negative
Madagascar's Homegrown Auto Industry Is Fascinating

While most of the cars we tend to encounter on a daily basis are made by huge, global corporations, it’s important to remember that there’s interesting cars being put together all over the world, including places that one doesn’t normally associate with automobile production. Madagascar is one of those places. As an island with a fairly small population, you wouldn’t think they’d have a completely indigenous and local car industry. But they do. It’s not big, but it is very interesting, and I think the cars they’ve built are pretty damn cool.

about 2 months indicative positive
Dollar Rain for Madagascar Players After First Ever AFCON Qualification
Dollar Rain for Madagascar Players After First Ever AFCON Qualification

Madagascar has rewarded the country's footballers as they qualifyied for first Africa Cup of Nations finals in Cameroon in 1-0 win over Equatorial Guinea.

2 months indicative neutral
Rich in Agriculture, Madagascar Suffers from Extreme Malnutrition - Madagascar

English News and Press Release on Madagascar about Disaster Management, Food and Nutrition, Children, Women, Drought and more; published on 24 Oct 2018 by IPS

2 months indicative positive
On the Moonshine Trail in Madagascar
On the Moonshine Trail in Madagascar

An inebriated journey to the heart of an off-the-books industry.

10 months indicative negative
What happens after a mining rush? Photographs from Madagascar
What happens after a mining rush? Photographs from Madagascar

Environmental science and conservation news

over 1 year conditional neutral
Fortune hunters flock to Madagascar’s sapphire mines
Fortune hunters flock to Madagascar’s sapphire mines

BETSINEFE, Madagascar: The dusty figure is lowered slowly into the ground like a bucket into a well, armed with just a crowbar, a shovel and an old, unreliable headlamp.In the surrounding countryside, bodies rise and sink from hundreds of holes just wide enough for a man.Children run between the rubble and the smell of cooking wafts from the makeshift shelters where women crouch over pots.Guards armed with hunting rifles stand by, turning the settlement of Betsinefe into a threatening scene.In the world of Madagascan sapphire mining, there are few rules.

almost 2 years indicative negative
Madagascar’s world-class cocoa, a bitter sweet cash crop
Madagascar’s world-class cocoa, a bitter sweet cash crop

AMBANJA: A massive zebu cow lumbers out of the tropical forest in Ambanja in the north of Madagascar carrying a heavy cartful of cocoa pods destined to become some of the most expensive chocolate in the world.“These red ones here, they are of the Criollo variety, the most sought-after cocoa in the world,” says Cyrille Ambarahova, a local small-scale farmer.

about 2 years indicative neutral

MGA currency converter